The Man of Cloud 9 by Adam Dreece

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5 PERSONAL MOMENTS CONNECTED TO THE MAN OF CLOUD 9 from Author Adam Dreece

5. When I worked in Silicon Valley for a Startup, we went through rounds of funding and fought for every customer. I heard a lot of people talking about their startups at the cafes, restaurants, and was regularly interviewed by many. The energy was high, the ideas sometimes ludicrous. I installed the story with that.

4. When I worked at Microsoft, I made two enemies. Both of them tried their best to have me denied a promotion. One by creating new procedures and lobbying as hard as they could for me to be denied, and the other actually was a director who went so far as to “uncheck” my promotion in the software that tracked that and managed to do it without leaving a trace. Both were vehement that I should be out. Why? Because for one, they hated that I had turned a friend’s career around, from him being ready to fire to becoming a super-star, and the other because I had been asked for my honest opinion in a meeting and I gave it to her, politely and politically wrapped but still honest. When finally confronted, both of them admitted to what they did and didn’t care. There were no consequences. I did get my promotion, but left a year or two later.I took some of this sentiment, this “it has nothing to do with you, but rather what you represent” hostility and incorporated it into my villain in the story. Moreover, I took that sense of “you are the manifestation of my imperfection” as the root of the conflict.

3. I’ve had people shut down my ideas because they didn’t want to take the time to understand them,. I adapted by learning it was better to ask for forgiveness than permission, particularly when I had been brought on to fix software projects. This idea is at the heart of Niko as a genius and inventor. He knows that few would potentially understand what he really wants, and he keeps it wrapped in layers and hidden impossibly deeply.

2. Several points in my life, I made a personal decision that was the right moral one, but it slowed my technical career. Niko faces the implications of such a moral decision, though we don’t know fully what it was until the end.

1. When I was 17 years old, I ran into the older brother of one of my best friends in the street. I asked how my friend was doing. He’d suffered a brain tumor a year before. The parents didn’t always allow my calls to pass through, they weren’t particularly fond of me because I was younger and didn’t share their ethnicity. I was told that my friend had died two months ago. It hit me like a ton of bricks. Niko suffers a loss at that age, and like me, he found purpose to help him come out of it. It gave him ruthless focus, only enough room for barely two things in his life.

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In 2014, Adam Dreece stopped hoping to be an author one day. He wrote and indie published the first two installments in his young adult, steampunk meets fairy tale, series The Yellow Hoods. In 2015, when the first two books became IAN Book of the Year finalists in YA and Fantasy, he released two more in the series, as well as a novelette. Along the way, Adam has become a fixture on Twitter and Facebook for his blog articles and willingness to help other authors. He’s a frequent speaker on cons, festivals and events. He’s currently working on his first science fiction novel called The Man of Cloud 9, and has a weekly serial called The Wizard Killer. In 2016 he plans to also bring out the 5th book in The Yellow Hoods series. He currently resides in Calgary, Alberta, Canada with his wife and children. He is an active online mentor at adamdreece.com, and is a busy public speaker, panelist, and author in Canada and the Pacific Northwest.

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THE MAN OF CLOUD 9 man-of-cloud-9-cover “a truly unique voice” – Tracy A. Fischer, Readers’ Favorite “Adam Dreece continues to surprise, enthrall, and sweep us, his avid readers, along – with his elegant prose and insightful story telling. If you, like I, enjoy the scifi/fantasy genre – you can’t do better than The Man of Cloud 9.” – Rene Auberjonois, Avid Reader, Actor/Director (incl Star Trek Deep Space 9’s Odo) — On extended Launch promotion (reg. $6.99) — Seventy years from now, climate change has damaged the world, and civilization has lost its appetite for radical dreamers and innovation. Niko Rafaelo believes that the key to our future lies in revisiting the banned technology of nanobots, and binding it with the human microbial cloud (the bacteria that surrounds each person). Cut from the same cloth as Steve Jobs and his Silicon Valley heroes of history, Niko is driven to see his dream become a reality, no matter the consequences. The Man of Cloud 9 is an intimate story, centred around the life of Niko Rafaelo and those closest to him. It reveals an all new side of Adam Dreece, best-selling author of The Yellow Hoods and The Wizard Killer.

Buy The Man of Cloud 9 Online

https://www.amazon.com/Man-Cloud-high-science-fiction-ebook/dp/B01HTVKDD6

https://store.kobobooks.com/en-ca/ebook/the-man-of-cloud-9

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/648114

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Under the Shadow — Book Blitz

Interview with author J.M. Kay

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Under the Shadow: Children of the First Star, Vol. 1

Can you give us a summary of your book?

 Under the Shadow is a story of self-discovery. Two thirteen-year-old boys, Jason Swann and Daniel Elliot, are forced into friendship as they are accidentally abducted by the Archivist, a robotic being created by an ancient alien race known as the Shantar Anar for the purpose of studying the universe. But of course, things that seem like coincidence reek of deeper mystery as the boys and the Archivist find themselves lost in an adventure on a foreign world, Ranis Anjiran.  What they discover there only further dismantles the myths surrounding their accidental abduction and their connection to the Shantar Anar.

While the boys are in far off worlds, their respective families in the small town of Ashton, in the American Midwest, desperately seek to find them, thinking the worst. Their search uncovers a hidden history with ties to the events surrounding Jason and Daniel’s journey.

What was your inspiration for writing Under the Shadow – Children of the First Star, Vol. 1?

I wanted to write a story that wasn’t just about good versus evil but about an evolution and about the ability to become a better version of oneself by looking within.  In that sense, it’s my homage to T.S. Eliot, whose poetry I fell in love with in high school and has always made me want to better understand who I really am as a person.

When did you know you wanted to become a writer?

I don’t know if there was ever a “light going off” moment, but the need to put my thoughts down onto page has been with me since probably late high school.  Writing was a way for me to empty my anxiety and my stress, to literally take it from my own body and put it on a page and I would always feel better afterwards.  From then, my desire to write evolved into a love of bringing my imagination into the world in a way where it would have a home and not be forgotten.  From there it was just a natural progression to thinking, wouldn’t it be amazing if this were my job?

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Have you always been interested in science fiction?  

Science fiction and fantasy were without a doubt my favorite genres growing up and in many ways they still are.  I have always been very fond of astronomy and physics and if my math skills were better I definitely would have pursued a career in a hard science.  Some of the best science fiction I have read isn’t just about spaceships and aliens but builds on a platform of real scientific research and imagines potentials based upon these theories.

Name your favorite book and author from when you were the age of the characters in this book and explain why it appealed to you so much.

That’s tough, a lot of choices, but maybe The Seventh Gate, which is the final installment of The Death Gate Cycle (Fantasy not Sci Fi)  by Margaret Weis and Tracy Hickman.  I read the series for the first time at around fourteen.  The world was very original, it employed a great magic system, and the depth and range of the characters they imagined into being were really amazing.

How long did it take you to write your book from start to finish?

I think it took me about two and a half years from first word to final draft, though that doesn’t include a stretch of about a year where I had to set it aside for work related issues.

What was the most challenging part about writing your book?

The most challenging part was not throwing it in the garbage and going to look for something else to do with my life after the first time I had a real editor do coverage. I was used to having writing critiqued but not to the extent where I knew I was going to have to spend months and months tearing apart and writing a new story, which I was already happy with. 

What are your writing goals for the next 12 months? 

In the next 12 months I hope to be able to finish my outline for A Moment in the Glass: Children of the First Star, Volume II and be well into writing the first draft.  If I have the time, I’d love to keep working on a series of humorous short stories I started a little while back and some poetry here and there always seems to find a way into the mix.

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Are you working on something right now? If so, can you tell us more about it?

I’ve started working on the plot points and the outline for Children of the First Star: Volume II which will continue the adventure of Jason and Daniel on the home planet of the Shantar Anar and will find those searching for them on Earth closer to the boys than they might ever have imagined.

 If you could meet three authors, which authors would you choose?
Really tough question and I’m not sure how I could even pick so I’m just going to choose three authors who’ve written books that changed the way I look at life.

Joseph Heller – The sardonic humor of Catch 22 is melded so perfectly with a profound understanding of the human condition and it inspired the title for my first collection of poetry, which I wrote during college Snowden’s Secret.

Milan Kundera – While I’ve read many of his books, The Unbearable Lightness of Being broke my heart during a time when I had lost a close friend.

Alexandre Dumas – The unabridged version of The Count of Monte Cristo is simply and without doubt the best book I have ever read in my entire life.

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